Pirelli Calendar 2013 by Steve McCurry

I am a big fan of Steve McCurry, his photos of Afghanistan and India are all so filled with action, meaning and color. But he is really know for is his intimate portraits of the people that he met while on his travels that i really like.

Therefore it is really interesting that he is shooting for the Pirelli Calendar 2013 which are known more for their beautiful (ahem also nude) models and exotic locations.

Check out the link for more.

http://nymag.com/thecut/2012/11/video-see-the-pirelli-models-get-rained-on.html

Shooting color film again

Lots of Film!

A few months back i got a big box of expired film from a friend (Thanks Chee Sern!), he was giving up film and he had loads of them. From Provia to NPS 160 to NPH 400 to Delta’s 100 and 400 (all expired). It was nice of him to give me a Nikon Coolscan V too :).

So i read up on expired film most recommend to overexpose by 1 stop depending on how old the film is. But i decided to shoot it at box speed first to see whats the results are like.

So fast forward a few months later, finally i got one roll of NPH400 exposed and sent it off for developing, usually i will go to Pensisular that area where Konata and a few trusted labs are to develop but i was just lazy since i don’t really pass by there on way to work and i really wanted to check if the expired NPH400 still can be used. I went to Compasspoint and found a photoshop (i have no idea what these places are called). I asked if they still developed film, they say yeap for $5 and takes about 4 days. I said yeah i can wait and so off the film goes. Haha the shop assistants looked at my NPH and asked if it was slides , i guess most people won’t shoot NPH anyway.

4 days passed and i collected my negatives back from them, fire up my Coolscan and Vuescan and started scanning. After correcting for levels and noise this is what i got.

Yeah the output is still abit noisy (don’t know if its due to the expired film), and it took me about 15-20mins to scan 6 frames @ 4000DPI and calibrating for film base color and offsets (which is a subject for a future post) it was all in all a lot of work. But seeing the output, it just looks and feels different from what i get from a digital camera, in fact i think the output feel is quite close to what my Ricoh GXR with M Mount gives me to a certain extent. For those who don’t know the GXR M Mount is a camera without an Anti Aliasing filter covering the sensor. The colors are not harsh but rather creamy and the tones look natural.

Quite a nice break from doing all the B&W stuff that i have been doing. Looking back at the process when i took the photos, i find that i was more delibrate when framing and I had more confidence in the equipment in areas like focusing. Why do i say that, for example when using an AF camera, sometimes i couldn’t really be sure that its in focus and I will  “chimp” and magnify to see if its in focus. When i am using manual cameras like the Leica or my FM2, I don’t really bother since I can’t see the results and most importantly I trust my equipment.

Anyway i will be shooting more film since i have quite a lot to go through :). Bought 2 roll of ektar 100 also to try it out and see what difference it makes to the scanning.

Notes:
Click on the photo for larger versions of the pictures.

All shots taken using a Leica M2 with either the Canon 50mm F1.8 LTM or the Voigtlander Ultron 35mm F1.7